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The Wellcome Library in London has released over 100,000 of its historical medical images for high-resolution download, and BBC News dug through the collection to unearth treasures such as the etching above. Apparently, circa 1785 medical science believed that gout was caused by the devil, too much wine, or…playing the viola da gamba?

I’ve met many who told me they didn’t understand how much trouble America was in until they retired and had time to watch Fox News.
BBC North America editor Mark Mardell on what ails America. Thanks for tearing this country apart, Messrs. Murdoch and Ailes.

How big is space? (Spoiler alert: it’s big.)

In an attempt to illustrate the size of the universe, the BBC has put together an enormous infographic that spans 58,180 vertical pixels (equivalent to 18 letter-sized pages printed at 300 dpi). And, when you get to the bottom…you’ve only reached the end of the Solar System. The graphic estimates that you’d have to keep scrolling for 22 million years to reach the far edges of the known universe. Live long and prosper, friends.

(this post was reblogged from nightline)
Lengthy. Reliable. Talented. Influential. Tremendous.

All of these words we use without a second thought were never part of the English language until the establishment of the United States.

The BBC laments how Americans are destroying the English language.

Which reminds me, remember Google Ngrams? Everyone was playing with it a couple of months ago. Anyway, it allows you to compare trends in usage among different words and phrases, but only in one language at a time. It would be really cool if it showed usage of the same word (or different words describing the same concept) over time for both British and American English on the same graph.

One hungry chimp went even further by urinating into the vessel to get hold of the prized snack….The fact that the peanut was urine-sodden did not deter the animal from eating it.
Osama bin Laden is not dead—he’s “dead.”
So here’s the question: why does BBC News put quotes around already-verified facts in their headlines? Is bin Laden “resting” or “pining for the fjords”? I’ve been reading them a long time and see this usage regularly. Is this some sort of standard British journalistic style?

Osama bin Laden is not dead—he’s “dead.”

So here’s the question: why does BBC News put quotes around already-verified facts in their headlines? Is bin Laden “resting” or “pining for the fjords”? I’ve been reading them a long time and see this usage regularly. Is this some sort of standard British journalistic style?