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thosefourstrings:

idroolinmysleep:

Ludwig van Beethoven, Symphony No. 7 in A, op. 92, II: Allegretto, Vienna Philharmonic Orchestra, Carlos Kleiber, cond.

In this recording, the string parts are played pizzicato all the way to the end of the movement instead of returning to arco for its last few bars as indicated by the score. Compare this to a performance that follows the score’s instructions.

um all the string parts are playing arco…. There is no pizzicato in this

Listen to the last 10 seconds or so of the track; it’s there. There is also a video of Kleiber conducting this—the camera angle is terrible, but starting at 7:48 you should notice the violins plucking instead of bowing their strings. The view is better at 7:20, but (if memory serves) pizzicato is indicated by the score here.

Kleiber isn’t the only one to conduct this way either. Of the recordings I have, Otto Klemperer does the pizzicato as well.

(this post was reblogged from thosefourstrings)
Played 1,717 times

Ludwig van Beethoven, Symphony No. 7 in A, op. 92, II: Allegretto, Vienna Philharmonic Orchestra, Carlos Kleiber, cond.

In this recording, the string parts are played pizzicato all the way to the end of the movement instead of returning to arco for its last few bars as indicated by the score. Compare this to a performance that follows the score’s instructions.

Played 3,113 times

Bedřich Smetana, “The Moldau” from Má Vlast, Vienna Philharmonic Orchestra, James Levine, cond.

Johann Strauss, Sr., Radetzky March, from the Vienna Philharmonic’s 2009 New Year’s Day concert, Daniel Barenboim, cond.

(My holiday music collection)

npr:

“We are in Vienna,” imagines NPR’s Robert Krulwich. “Leonard Bernstein is on the podium. The Vienna  Philharmonic is on the stage, Haydn’s Symphony no.88 is in the air, and  our question is: Where are Bernstein’s hands?  Why isn’t he using his  hands? He’s moving nothing — except his face.”
Replies Ezra Block: “My friend George Steel, Director of the New York City Opera calls  this technique ‘eyebrows only,’ though as you can see, his chin is  working, his eyes are darting, his mouth is up, down. He’s liking,  noticing, saying thank you using only his face muscles. You should let people see this.”
Krulwich: “Ok, ok. Here’s Leonard Bernstein finishing an encore performance of the 4th movement of Haydn’s 88th. Watch the man.”

npr:

“We are in Vienna,” imagines NPR’s Robert Krulwich. “Leonard Bernstein is on the podium. The Vienna Philharmonic is on the stage, Haydn’s Symphony no.88 is in the air, and our question is: Where are Bernstein’s hands?  Why isn’t he using his hands? He’s moving nothing — except his face.”

Replies Ezra Block: “My friend George Steel, Director of the New York City Opera calls this technique ‘eyebrows only,’ though as you can see, his chin is working, his eyes are darting, his mouth is up, down. He’s liking, noticing, saying thank you using only his face muscles. You should let people see this.”

Krulwich: “Ok, ok. Here’s Leonard Bernstein finishing an encore performance of the 4th movement of Haydn’s 88th. Watch the man.”

(this post was reblogged from npr)