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Maps and demographics of Los Angeles’s neighborhoods, via the Los Angeles Times's Mapping L.A. Project

Maps and demographics of Los Angeles’s neighborhoods, via the Los Angeles Times's Mapping L.A. Project

nprfreshair:

See how foreign-born groups settled across the United States (New York Times, 2009)

Maybe we can compare this map against this map of last names.

And, odd thing? The 1900 Census showed a (relatively) large migration of Mexicans to Hawaii. Why?

(this post was reblogged from nprfreshair)
The New York Times maps the 2010 census
Came across this late last night. I have no idea when this was published, but I assume it’s pretty recent, as the NYT’s previous map is based on sample data from 2005 to 2009 instead of the actual 2010 census count.

The New York Times maps the 2010 census

Came across this late last night. I have no idea when this was published, but I assume it’s pretty recent, as the NYT’s previous map is based on sample data from 2005 to 2009 instead of the actual 2010 census count.

shortformblog:

NYT decides to show off by making insane demographic map

There’s everyone else, and then there’s the NYT. And we’re proven this fact yet again with his crazy demographic map based on U.S. Census data. You can get very detailed with this thang. We think they’re just showing off this time. source

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This reminds me of the maps Eric Fischer made back in September, but the New York Times ups the ante (significantly) with interactivity, newer data, and additional maps.

(this post was reblogged from shortformblog)

So the last map from this series has been making the rounds here on Tumblr. The point of the original article is that there is a growing education gap in America, but it’s been interpreted in the reblogs and comments as “hyuk, hyuk, America is getting stupider.” Well, it may feel that way, but I don’t think we can draw that conclusion from these maps.

The maps depict deviation from the national average in the percentage of people holding college degrees, with red representing below average (fewer degree holders) and blue above; the deeper the color, the greater the deviation. Over time, you can see an increase in the deep red counties. So there’s a brain drain from all these counties right? Not necessarily. Notice that the percentage of degree-holders has increased nationally in this time, so a county where, say, 25% of its adults have college degrees would have been mapped as blue in 1990 but fallen into pink in 2009. Granted, standing still while others move forward is effectively the same as falling behind, but it doesn’t mean the people are becoming less educated in absolute terms.

That said, the maps don’t help matters with their sloppy execution. Many commenters have pointed out the misspelling in the 2009 map’s title. There is also confusion about the first map as its title says 1990 but legend says 2000. Further, the legend does not clearly distinguish the cut-off points between the categories. Taking the 1990 map as an example again, would a county with a 20% degree-holding population be above average or below?

(Daily Yonder, via AZspot)

Who’s your neighbor? The racial and ethnic make up of New York (and other cities), mapped. The color scheme could be more, shall we say, direct, but,
Red is White, Blue is Black, Green is Asian, and Orange is Hispanic, and each dot is 25 people.  Data from Census 2000.

Who’s your neighbor? The racial and ethnic make up of New York (and other cities), mapped. The color scheme could be more, shall we say, direct, but,

Red is White, Blue is Black, Green is Asian, and Orange is Hispanic, and each dot is 25 people. Data from Census 2000.