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What’s Closer to Texas Than Texas Is to Itself?

Points in the map’s red section are closer to somewhere in Texas than the opposite sides of Texas are to each other.

That’s right: You can be in Fargo, or Atlanta, or San Diego … and be closer to Texas than Texas is to itself.

That’s what the map above says. Texas is big.

(Source: reddit.com)

Today’s Headline 1: Here is a map of all the countries with territorial disputes

A special mention goes to Mongolia. It’s the only country of mainland Asia not involved in territorial disputes.

Eh, not so fast. It may not technically have any territorial disputes, but…

Today’s Headline 2: Mongolia v. Crimea — Chinese See Uncomfortable Parallels

Return Mongolia to us, and then we’ll support the Crimean referendum.

The Chinese really, really want Mongolia back.

theatlantic:

What You Get When 30 People Draw a World Map From Memory

Maps, as I’ve written before, are inherently subjective—no matter how detailed or scientific, they reflect our worldview and the age in which we’re living, not to mention the difficulty of projecting a spherical globe onto a plane surface. Now compound these challenges by asking 30 people to sketch a map of the world from memory. What would you get?

In the summer of 2012, Zak Ziebell, now a 17-year-old high school senior in San Antonio, did just that.

Read more. [Image: Zak Ziebell]

(this post was reblogged from theatlantic)

sunfoundation:

The New Secessionists

Plotting whitehouse.gov secession petitions

It may not be obvious from the map, but there are petitions for secession from all 50 states. Maybe all these states should band together and call themselves a united country or something. Wait, what?

(this post was reblogged from sunfoundation)

kiplinger:

The U.S. suffers from staggering economic inequality — as staggering, in some places, as Nigeria, El Salvador and the Dominican Republic. Richard Florida ran the numbers and compared cities in the U.S. to highly unequal foreign countries. That colorful map might look pretty, but its implications for U.S. income inequality are not.

(this post was reblogged from kiplinger)

sunfoundation:

Interactive: Mapping the census

In Virginia, the hispanic population is skyrocketing and the white population is dwindling. In the Maryland suburbs, diversity is growing. These stories and many more come from the census data that is displayed in this map. Use it to reveal your own stories. Type in your city or zip code below to get started.

(this post was reblogged from sunfoundation)

Regional variations the generic name for streams in the US. “River” and “creek” are shown in gray.

highcountrynews:

This Map Shows Where All The Trees Are In The US

NASA’s Earth Observatory just released a map illustrating where all the trees are in America. The map was created over six years by Josef Kellndorfer and Wayne Walker of the Woods Hole Research Center (WHRC) in collaboration with the U.S. Forest Service and U.S. Geological Survey. The dark swaths of green represent parts of the country with the greatest concentration of biomass. You can see dense tree cover in the Pacific Northwest as well as New England, which has been reforested after intensive logging in the 18th and 19th centuries.

(this post was reblogged from kateoplis)
saintkimjongil:

Metro map

That’s it?!? Somebody who reads Korean please tell me where this is.

saintkimjongil:

Metro map

That’s it?!? Somebody who reads Korean please tell me where this is.

(this post was reblogged from saintkimjongil)
The spread of newspapers across the U.S. See the Rural West Initiative at Stanford University for a larger and more interactive version of these maps.

The spread of newspapers across the U.S. See the Rural West Initiative at Stanford University for a larger and more interactive version of these maps.